3 Reasons to Stop Sending E-mails at Night

It’s 9:45 p.m. and you’re working at home, because “if I don’t get a few things checked off my list tonight, I’ll have a terrible day tomorrow.” But whatever you do, don’t click “Send.”

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Image courtesy saranv on Flickr

There are three reasons you should not send e-mail after about 7:00 p.m. in the evening:

4 Things I Learned on a Grant-Review Panel

I had the pleasure of serving this spring on the regional review panel for the Virginia Commission for the Arts’ annual funding cycle. It was a fascinating process, and I learned a few key things worth sharing:

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Image courtesy luxomedia on Flickr

1) It is a mountain of work for the reviewers

The panel on which I served reviewed only 36 applications. It took me over 30 hours to read them and make notes. Major funders — foundations, major corporations, etc. — probably get way more. So remember that your grant application is just one of many that will have to be reviewed, and be thankful and conscious of the size of this burden.

Outsourcing the Low-Hanging Fruit

You have them — we all do. There are probably several responsibilities you “have to do” that make you feel like you’re wasting your time. But do you really have to do them?

Low-Hanging Fruit

Image courtesy of iancarroll on Flickr

In late 2013, I was underwater. Our organization’s recent successes were causing huge increases in my biggest time-vacuums: IT maintenance, website, e-newsletter and social media. Of course, all four of these things are critically important to our success, and they have to be done. But without question, these four functions could — and should — be done by someone other than the executive director.

The Email You Can’t Live Without

If your nonprofit is still operating in the dark ages regarding email and calendars, pay attention.

Image courtesy of cicciodylan via Flickr

Image courtesy of cicciodylan on Flickr

Microsoft is now offering Office 365 for FREE. Office 365 includes services that only the biggest, most sophisticated nonprofits used to be able to afford: